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  #1  
Old May 21st 2014, 07:07 AM
Watka Watka is offline
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I'm a 49 years old sozial worker from Germamy.
I like to meditate Vipassana and are interested in shamanism and the old cults of the geat Goddess.
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  #2  
Old May 26th 2014, 07:36 PM
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I'm a 49 years old sozial worker from Germamy.
I like to meditate Vipassana and are interested in shamanism and the old cults of the geat Goddess.
to the forum.

The only "great goddess" religion that I've heard of is neolithic or pre-agricultural. Since the advent of agriculture, male war-type gods seem to have supplanted female-nature gods.
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  #3  
Old May 26th 2014, 09:10 PM
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I'm a 49 years old sozial worker from Germamy.
I like to meditate Vipassana and are interested in shamanism and the old cults of the geat Goddess.
Welcome aboard, Watka
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  #4  
Old May 27th 2014, 11:48 AM
voiceoftheshires voiceoftheshires is offline
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Greetings from the heart of the English countryside, hope you liven up this board it has become rather quiet
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Old May 27th 2014, 11:57 AM
shekib82 shekib82 is offline
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Originally Posted by voiceoftheshires View Post
Greetings from the heart of the English countryside, hope you liven up this board it has become rather quiet
discussion boards are a dying breed. People now are using blogs and combing them with twitter. Or just using facebook.
I have tried to catch the new wave, but can't quite get the hang of twitter. They say that if you get it, it becomes indispensable.

there is also reddit, but that too isn't quite easy to grasp.

But anyway welcome to the forum.
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Old May 29th 2014, 09:03 PM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
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Welcome (sorry, did not notice this thread before).
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  #7  
Old Jun 1st 2014, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by shekib82 View Post
discussion boards are a dying breed. People now are using blogs and combing them with twitter. Or just using facebook.
I have tried to catch the new wave, but can't quite get the hang of twitter. They say that if you get it, it becomes indispensable.

there is also reddit, but that too isn't quite easy to grasp.
I really shouldn't post a response to this in this thread, but it is a topic I know a little bit about and can't resist.

My apologies to the OP for the digression.

I think that the present general decline in the popularity of internet forums follows a relatively predictable pattern of historical development. I expect that in the near future they may return in popularity, though probably not in their present and particular form.

Generally speaking, the first generation of internet users were people who were already familiar with and somewhat interested in computers before they became internet users. As such, they were influenced by an existing 'computer culture'. In this world, discussion forums as we know them, were developed as specialized and specifically suited to that medium (that being an electronic bulletin-board-service, aka BBS, originated back in the early 1980's, even earlier for the serious techno-nerds). As such, for the first generation of the internet, discussion forums were the 'go-to' model for those looking to engage in large-scale discussion (on any given topic/group/idea of interest) that computers make possible.

However, a second generation of internet users were generally people who acquired a computer, or computer access, in order to access the internet that they heard about from a wave of mass media commericalization that hit the internet beginning around 1995 or so and peaked in the late 90's with the "dot.com" bubble and the "Y2k" thing. That it so say, they were 'wannabe' internet users before they became computer users. As such, they were not generally influenced by a pre-existing computer or internet culture where the discussion forum was popular. Lacking any direction, they pretty much just invented their own internet culture as they went (or rather, as it was fed to them by the corporate behemoths).

This is the story of AOL, Geocities, MSMessenger, MySpace, Blogs and now Facebook. If you want to find the most lively discussions on the internet, they can be found these days in the comments sections of blogs and news sites, or spread across some web of obscure Facebook pages, or in the comments/discussion sections at Wikipedia or IMDB or Redit or any number of other places. Internet discussion is certainly alive and lively and going on all over the place. Discussion forums devoted to sports, video gaming or knitting are notorious for having a plethora of lively discussions (and brutal arguments) about religion and politics and last nights tv show. Internet discussion isn't dead, not by a long shot.

The problem for people who want to engage in some reasonably intelligent discussion in a systematic way, is that it has become too scattered and entirely chaotic. You may stumble upon an excellent discussion in a blog comment thread, highly relevant to the blog post it is attached to, or the thread may be filled with idle chit-chat about last night's tv shows or what's for dinner. More insidiously still, present forms of internet discussion seem to mirror US political partisan polarity in the self-selection that this process represents. People seem to want to discuss controversial topics only within the limits of their own set biases - that's disturbing - but it is a product the internet's ability to pander to self-selection. In the past, we never had this ability of people to self-select into like-minded groups so easily. Normally, that was a rather difficult to do. The internet makes it so easy and natural.

In other words, traditional style discussion forums appear to be in decline right now, swamped out by a bazillion other available avenues for discussion that have come to exist on the net. I don't think that the present forms of internet discussion are very efficient or effective (because it is so scattered and almost random), so eventually, those people that are inclined may seek out new and better places for discussion than blog comment threads and if they do, the traditional discussion forum really is a pretty damn good model for organizing public discussions, so it likely will survive. Indeed, they originated from frustration at the same scattered discussion problem that is going on right now. Earlier forms of electronic email and list-server discussion groups had serious limitations not unlike the present that BBS style forums were built to solve so history may possibly repeat itself here (if one will pardon the expression in such a context).
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  #8  
Old Jun 1st 2014, 12:26 PM
shekib82 shekib82 is offline
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Default Re: Hello

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
I really shouldn't post a response to this in this thread, but it is a topic I know a little bit about and can't resist.

My apologies to the OP for the digression.

I think that the present general decline in the popularity of internet forums follows a relatively predictable pattern of historical development. I expect that in the near future they may return in popularity, though probably not in their present and particular form.

Generally speaking, the first generation of internet users were people who were already familiar with and somewhat interested in computers before they became internet users. As such, they were influenced by an existing 'computer culture'. In this world, discussion forums as we know them, were developed as specialized and specifically suited to that medium (that being an electronic bulletin-board-service, aka BBS, originated back in the early 1980's, even earlier for the serious techno-nerds). As such, for the first generation of the internet, discussion forums were the 'go-to' model for those looking to engage in large-scale discussion (on any given topic/group/idea of interest) that computers make possible.

However, a second generation of internet users were generally people who acquired a computer, or computer access, in order to access the internet that they heard about from a wave of mass media commericalization that hit the internet beginning around 1995 or so and peaked in the late 90's with the "dot.com" bubble and the "Y2k" thing. That it so say, they were 'wannabe' internet users before they became computer users. As such, they were not generally influenced by a pre-existing computer or internet culture where the discussion forum was popular. Lacking any direction, they pretty much just invented their own internet culture as they went (or rather, as it was fed to them by the corporate behemoths).

This is the story of AOL, Geocities, MSMessenger, MySpace, Blogs and now Facebook. If you want to find the most lively discussions on the internet, they can be found these days in the comments sections of blogs and news sites, or spread across some web of obscure Facebook pages, or in the comments/discussion sections at Wikipedia or IMDB or Redit or any number of other places. Internet discussion is certainly alive and lively and going on all over the place. Discussion forums devoted to sports, video gaming or knitting are notorious for having a plethora of lively discussions (and brutal arguments) about religion and politics and last nights tv show. Internet discussion isn't dead, not by a long shot.

The problem for people who want to engage in some reasonably intelligent discussion in a systematic way, is that it has become too scattered and entirely chaotic. You may stumble upon an excellent discussion in a blog comment thread, highly relevant to the blog post it is attached to, or the thread may be filled with idle chit-chat about last night's tv shows or what's for dinner. More insidiously still, present forms of internet discussion seem to mirror US political partisan polarity in the self-selection that this process represents. People seem to want to discuss controversial topics only within the limits of their own set biases - that's disturbing - but it is a product the internet's ability to pander to self-selection. In the past, we never had this ability of people to self-select into like-minded groups so easily. Normally, that was a rather difficult to do. The internet makes it so easy and natural.

In other words, traditional style discussion forums appear to be in decline right now, swamped out by a bazillion other available avenues for discussion that have come to exist on the net. I don't think that the present forms of internet discussion are very efficient or effective (because it is so scattered and almost random), so eventually, those people that are inclined may seek out new and better places for discussion than blog comment threads and if they do, the traditional discussion forum really is a pretty damn good model for organizing public discussions, so it likely will survive. Indeed, they originated from frustration at the same scattered discussion problem that is going on right now. Earlier forms of electronic email and list-server discussion groups had serious limitations not unlike the present that BBS style forums were built to solve so history may possibly repeat itself here (if one will pardon the expression in such a context).
nice post, makes a lot of sense.
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  #9  
Old Jun 5th 2014, 10:17 PM
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Dominick Dominick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
[...]
The problem for people who want to engage in some reasonably intelligent discussion in a systematic way, [...]
That's the weakness in the whole argument right there. That group is tiny and eroding ever further. You mentioned IMDB. Pick any movie which requires even a minimum of thinking and go read the IMDB comment section. All of it. 'Read and weep' was never more appropriate.
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  #10  
Old Jun 6th 2014, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
That's the weakness in the whole argument right there. That group is tiny and eroding ever further. You mentioned IMDB. Pick any movie which requires even a minimum of thinking and go read the IMDB comment section. All of it. 'Read and weep' was never more appropriate.
I mentioned IMDB only as an example of the kind of places where people are presently engaged in 'discussion' (Facebook as well). I certainly agree that 'quality' discussion is very rare. People just don't seem to want it. They seem to prefer either monoculture 'group-think' or 'partisan pissing match' type engagements.

Even back in the day at USPO when we did have a few 'good discussions', it was still a rare event amidst a high level of lowgrade discussion.

Indeed, they voted me the poster that 'makes the best threads' because I think some of the better quality discussion that did take place, tended to take place in threads I created.
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