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Old Oct 6th 2014, 11:35 PM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Lightbulb Leviathan

Thomas Hobbes political philosophy treatise "Leviathan" (1651) presents the notion that man seeks to make flexible contracts between government and citizenry in order to leave room for innovation an revolution.

The word 'Leviathan' is a spiritual concept referring to a dragon or beast of chaos and darkness. When one encounters Leviathan, one is humbled into a state of bewilderment and anxiety.

Leviathan is a useful idea in our modern age of profit-driven networking, where contracts seem to be based purely on economics rather than on politics or religion.

In fact, it seems that modern day intrigue surrounding free market activity of Hong Kong (once more closely tied to Communist China) is less associated with spiritual or even political negotiations between democratic USA and China and more associated with economic contracts between capitalist USA and China.

We can arguably reference Leviathan as a term to discuss today's focus on profit-based social investments (i.e., World Bank).


Should this make us feel cynical?






Leviathan

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Old Oct 9th 2014, 09:14 AM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Default Network Fingering

It is perhaps useful to conceptualize Leviathan in terms of perceptual events that signify uncertainties regarding sensitization.

Such events may be related to the experience of color-blindness.

The bizarre shaking of the Tacoma Narrows bridge (Washington State), for example, caused by immense air pocket shifts that create layered wind-rolling, visually feels like 'geometric uncertainty.'

Another example: the terrorist attack on the Twin Towers on 9/11 signifies a social uncertainty regarding civilization infrastructure fatigue.

When such events are witnessed, the human mind feels confounded by a sort of philosophical color-blindness (or, expectation violation).

This could add fuel to the fire of the argument that Leviathan can be considered as an abacus for modern consumerism age analysis of networking overload.




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Old Oct 9th 2014, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: Network Fingering

I don't quite understand the application of Hobbes here. I generally find Hobbes to be utterly full of shit, by the way, but I'm not sure that's critically relevant.

I don't like the idea of leviathan-izing Capitalism because it's a system not an entity.
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Old Oct 9th 2014, 05:34 PM
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Default Re: Leviathan

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Originally Posted by Abishai100 View Post
Thomas Hobbes political philosophy treatise "Leviathan" (1651) presents the notion that man seeks to make flexible contracts between government and citizenry in order to leave room for innovation an revolution.
Hmmm... I think you have this backwards.

Hobbes argues [figuratively speaking] that the state has the right to rule - and to crush rebellions and anything else it deems necessary for its own survival.
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Old Oct 30th 2014, 03:40 AM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Lightbulb Fielding

I want to put forward four images of eschewed behavior which can be construed as the sort of radical social contract-alteration that Hobbes would discuss.

1. The maniacal chainsaw-wielding psychopath Leatherface chases a young American man down a dusty road, and just when the young man is about to get away, Leatherface hurls his chainsaw at him and it pierces the young man's back.

2. A very popular movie star leads an excessive lifestyle which is overlooked and 'pardoned' by the legions of hypnotized fans obsessed with the power and 'magic' and star appeal that the cinema has already afforded the brash talent.

3. A stage magician gone mad decides to hold his regular woman-in-a-box saw cutting illusion one night in front of an unexpecting audience and actually kills the woman in the box intentionally.

4. The German tennis superstar Steffi Graf resurges on the world stage after being thrashed by newcomer sensation Monica Seles when the upstart Seles is shockingly attacked and handicapped by a Graf-obsessed stalker-fan who seeks to eliminate Seles from the international competition arena.


All of these four cases involve some kind of shock or expectation violation that is precisely related to the sorts of contract-negotiation thoughts human beings have when they contemplate the natural paranoia associated with 'conscious risk.'


Such conceptualization analogies can help us form economics models that represent rapid decision-making. This is the sort of uncertainty anxiety that religion scholars discuss when they cite (i.e., Biblical) concepts about danger.






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Old Jan 22nd 2015, 03:57 PM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Let me address a few points in this reply:

1. Capitalism is a system and not an entity, but Hobbes might suggest that Leviathan refers to a system so vibrant that it feels like an entity (i.e., Gaia hypothesis).

2. Hobbes did say that the state can adjust rules arbitrarily (and hence squash rebellions), but he also seemed to suggest that since the state is run by people, the people can imagine being hated by their citizenry or subjects.

3. If Leviathan is an entity that can indeed be viewed as a self-reinforcing (and self-feeding) monster of sorts, how does such a comment compare with ideas that a system destroys its subjects/members when it is threatened? Does such a question allude to the image of a monster/dragon literally 'absorbing' the intelligence of dissidents (i.e., brainwashing, excommunication, human sacrifice, etc.)?

The temptation to use 'monster' imagery leads me to comic book superhuman characters such as Aquaman (DC Comics) [who represent a social fascination with 'transcending claustrophobia'] when discussing Hobbes' perspective on Leviathan or Leviathan in general...





http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquaman
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Old Jan 22nd 2015, 05:08 PM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
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Default Re: Leviathan

I thought this would be about the movie (http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...s-to-hate.html).

Was going to comment.

But this I know nothing about.
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Old Jan 23rd 2015, 10:00 AM
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Default Re: Leviathan

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeMyselfAndI View Post
I thought this would be about the movie (http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...s-to-hate.html).

Was going to comment.

But this I know nothing about.
The film looks interesting. I should like to see it.
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  #9  
Old Jul 29th 2015, 03:17 AM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Lightbulb Labor & Mischief: Shuttle

"Leviathan" (1989) starring Peter Weller is indeed a very entertaining and haunting sci-fi horror film about undersea miners encountering a bizarre genetically-mutated creature that absorbs the bodies and brains of its victims to become bigger and more powerful.

I was thinking the other day that since our world seems to be very motivated in making sophisticated trade contracts (i.e., World Bank), that labor has become a very symbolic issue.

I'd like to hear/read more about concepts of labor and how they can be applied to discussions about government and defiance.

America is a rather successful capitalist system, and it is no surprise that Americans celebrate labor-candy Hollywood (USA) movies such as "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), a noted film about the iconic Depression-era bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow.

The philosopher-writer Rousseau wrote very specifically about the implications and aspects of making and/or forging contracts, both from a legal and a cultural sense. He suggested that the 'quality' of contracts can define the nature of labor in society.

If labor is integral to contracts, how is Leviathan associated with mischief?

Certainly, mischief is a recurring background theme in various films and books about social expectations.




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Leviathan (Film)



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Old May 18th 2017, 05:34 AM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Default Memory Book

I feel it might be wise to lighten the heaviness of this thread with a more metaphysical approach to the analysis/evaluation of 'Leviathan.'

When I look at photo-negatives, I see of course unprocessed film, but I also see (with a more spiritual/sentimental eye) complete inversion that does not destroy the integrity of a form/shape.

This maintenance of geometry must have some deep philosophical meaning. I mean, why would geometric shapes be maintained after being 'treated' by the elements/weather/labor/etc.?

When I was a child, my parents showed me a photograph of a very old ancestor who died as an infant tragically due to a malady. It was remarkable how much this child-ancestor of mine resembled another relative of mine who was still living. While I don't subscribe personally to beliefs in reincarnation, I had to remark at the 'human magic' felt (in my emotions at least) by the sight of a deceased relative who resembled a living relative so much.

I started thinking about how much photographs (and photo-negatives) stir in the human mind feelings about preservation and the sentimentalization of memory.

If 'Leviathan' can be used to designate 'unruliness,' how should we discuss it in terms of the concept of homeostasis and/or resilience?

To this day (after seeing that photo of my child-ancestor), I feel a strange emotion of curiosity and imagination-intrigue when I see unprocessed photos (or photo-negatives)...


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