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  #11  
Old Sep 18th 2014, 02:40 AM
shekib82 shekib82 is offline
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Default Re: Mahabharata (Hinduism)

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Originally Posted by NickKIELCEPoland View Post
Abishai100, you still haven't answered this question; do you believe that Shiva and Krishna exist?
this issues seems to be eating you up inside.
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  #12  
Old Sep 18th 2014, 02:44 AM
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NickKIELCEPoland NickKIELCEPoland is offline
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Default Re: Mahabharata (Hinduism)

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this issues seems to be eating you up inside.
They aren't - but Abishai100 appears not to have noticed my questions. If he doesn't want to answer them that's his right and it won't bother me at all - but he could just either answer the question, or say "I don't want to answer that question." Otherwise, I can only assume he hasn't noticed the question.
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  #13  
Old Sep 18th 2014, 02:59 AM
shekib82 shekib82 is offline
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Default Re: Mahabharata (Hinduism)

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Originally Posted by NickKIELCEPoland View Post
They aren't - but Abishai100 appears not to have noticed my questions. If he doesn't want to answer them that's his right and it won't bother me at all - but he could just either answer the question, or say "I don't want to answer that question." Otherwise, I can only assume he hasn't noticed the question.
send him a PM, no need to keep repeating yourself on the forum.
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  #14  
Old Sep 18th 2014, 06:40 AM
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NickKIELCEPoland NickKIELCEPoland is offline
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Default Re: Mahabharata (Hinduism)

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send him a PM, no need to keep repeating yourself on the forum.
You are right, I suppose. No point either, it seems. He doesn't seem to want to answer the question, so I'll stop.

Last edited by NickKIELCEPoland; Sep 18th 2014 at 06:45 AM.
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  #15  
Old Sep 24th 2014, 09:06 AM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Lightbulb Shiva

I like Catholicism, but the reason I believe Shiva is real in some way is because he represents divine control over mischief. Mischief seems to be one of those things in the human mind that there just seems to be very little control over.

In Peter Brook's British adaptation of "The Mahabharata" (Vyasa), we see a visual depiction of the visitation of Shiva. In the film, we Shiva visiting Arjuna and testing him of his mettle with archery and arrogance. Later, Krishna of course guides Shiva towards the values of war and leadership, but it is Shiva who provides Arjuna with subtle hints about the complexities of skill as they relate to the human vice of arrogance.

Shiva instructing Arjuna on arrogance must be some intellectual sign of humanity's curiosity about general control over pride and mischief.

Modern American comic book characters such as the Joker (DC Comics), an anarchist terrorist and nemesis of the valiant caped crusader Batman, deploys various mischievous schemes designed to promote general mayhem.

Mischief seems to be one of those things that draws the human mind towards sometimes dangerous thoughts about daredevil courage, chaos, and trouble-making.

Mischief may not be motivated by profiteerism, but I think "The Mahabharata" (Vyasa) suggests that analysis of the philosophy of arrogance distributed by Shiva reinforces notions of self-control in times of war and conflict.

Maybe Abraham Lincoln is like a real life Shiva.






Shiva


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  #16  
Old Sep 24th 2014, 11:41 AM
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NickKIELCEPoland NickKIELCEPoland is offline
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Default Re: Shiva

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Originally Posted by Abishai100 View Post
I like Catholicism, but the reason I believe Shiva is real in some way is because he represents divine control over mischief. Mischief seems to be one of those things in the human mind that there just seems to be very little control over.
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I'm a Catholic by faith,
http://www.discussionworldforum.com/...ead.php?t=5151

Being a Catholic, you would like Cathoicism.

Two questions; what do you think the Pope would say if he knew a Catholic like you believed in Shiva, as well as in God. And do you think God and Shiva are acquainted?
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  #17  
Old Sep 25th 2014, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: Shiva

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Originally Posted by Abishai100 View Post
I like Catholicism, but the reason I believe Shiva is real in some way is because he represents divine control over mischief. Mischief seems to be one of those things in the human mind that there just seems to be very little control over.
Ah yes, Loki and Pan.
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  #18  
Old Dec 19th 2014, 04:13 AM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Lightbulb Kali: Challenger Model

I want to make one more note about mischief here in regards to the possible real existence of an entity named Shiva, supreme male controller of powers.

In Hinduism, the diametric opposite of Shiva is arguably Kali, a goddess who exhibits traits very similar to Shiva --- rage, majesty, wildness, ruggedness, individualism, anarchism, and vengeance. Shiva and Kali have also been linked in mythologies as husband and wife.

Because Kali is a woman, can we argue that the gender intrigue here could theoretically nullify the power and/or existence of Shiva? Certainly, many feminists would contend just that.

The Mahabharata (Vyasa) seems to suggest that in the framework of war and peace, control of mischief and vanities by higher powers or by great contemplation by ordinary man leads scholars to present ideas about 'values interpretation' liberalness (of, if you like, 'laissez-faire ethics').

Maybe that's why Hindu philosophy has been in the past adopted by liberals in the West (i.e., hippies in America).






http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feminism


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  #19  
Old Dec 19th 2014, 08:01 PM
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Default Re: Kali: Challenger Model

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Maybe that's why Hindu philosophy has been in the past adopted by liberals in the West (i.e., hippies in America).
You've got to be kidding.

At best, one might say that American hippies were inspired by a bit of Buddhism. But America hippies were never fanatically fascist or racist enough to be compared with Hinduism. Not even close.

As far as major religions go, Hinduism is about the only religion on the planet that can make Christianity or Islam look civilized by comparison.
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  #20  
Old Jul 10th 2015, 09:44 PM
Abishai100 Abishai100 is offline
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Lightbulb Karna/Achilles: Passion Pillow

Hinduism is definitely a libertine belief system that makes other religions seem very austere and diligent in comparison.

However, one character in "The Mahabharata" (Vyasa) that offers a contradictory potion to Hindu proverbs about 'wildness' is Karna.

Karna is a disowned child who must fight for everything he gains. He decides to challenge the dominion of the brilliant Pandava, and his mother Kunti asks him to put aside his vengeful ways and seek peace. Karna refuses but agrees to spare the lives of all her Pandava sons except the ordained warrior-prince Arjuna.

Karna, like Shiva (the Hindu god of destruction and meditation), symbolizes a psychological fascination with controlling the instinct to do mischief even when circumstances allow for deeds of derring-do.

How is Vyasa's Karna like Homer's Achilles? They are both doomed to failure, even though they both represent vigilantism passion.




Karna (Mahabharata Character)

Achilles (Illiad Character)

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