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Old Dec 7th 2010, 04:10 PM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
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Default Slavic Paganism

Ancient Slavs had one of the largest polytheistic pantheons in history

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_mythology#Pantheon

After Christianisation, the Old Faith, as we call it, had died out for awhile.

Today, however, we see a comeback. In Ukraine, there is a large pagan community centered around the city of Lvov. In Belarus, there is a pagan presense now in Vitebsk. And Russia, of course, has the largest pagan fraternity. Polytheistic communities are spread in rural areas from European North (Mumansk, my home, Arkhangelsk, etc) to Central Siberia.

Russian and other Slavic pagans pray to wooden figures carved out of whole trees:


The figures ('idols') depict gods such as Perun, Yarilo, Veles.

Those who pray to Yarilo, the God of Sun, Fire, and Fertility set up large fires on Yarilo Day, April 5th I think



Then, comes the part for which many young men attend these celebrations lol


(I assume all here are of appropriate age for such pictures. If not, Michael, feel free to delete)

They have beautiful ceremonies, though I do not understand all of them



Young men also learn traditional combat arts there

Because our ancestors were never a peaceful people But I don't think anyone was peaceful back then, not by today's standards in any case.
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Old Dec 7th 2010, 04:20 PM
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

Does indeed seem a good reason to attend.
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Old Dec 8th 2010, 01:26 AM
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

Amazing the similarities between these pantheons and the Celtic one with which I am most familiar in my own religious beliefs. Then again, one would expect to find similarities in similar climates where the elemental forces are basically the same. This leads to similar deity figures and dancing naked women are just a good pagan idea all around! Interestingly enough, many of us also call it the Old Ways.
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Old Dec 8th 2010, 10:52 AM
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

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Originally Posted by Greendruid View Post
Amazing the similarities between these pantheons and the Celtic one with which I am most familiar in my own religious beliefs. Then again, one would expect to find similarities in similar climates where the elemental forces are basically the same. This leads to similar deity figures and dancing naked women are just a good pagan idea all around! Interestingly enough, many of us also call it the Old Ways.
I thought the same thing - that this Slavic paganism looks almost identical to Celtic paganism.

I suppose one shouldn't be surprised at that, given the many remarkable similarities found across many pagan and/or pantheistic religions (Roman vs Greek vs Nordic for example, all very similar in form).
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Old Dec 8th 2010, 01:45 PM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

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Originally Posted by Michael View Post
I thought the same thing - that this Slavic paganism looks almost identical to Celtic paganism.

I suppose one shouldn't be surprised at that, given the many remarkable similarities found across many pagan and/or pantheistic religions (Roman vs Greek vs Nordic for example, all very similar in form).
Well, Russians in particular we actually are partially Nordic/Scandinavian.

Here is a bit of history for you. There were a people once, very long ago, maybe before Christ, called Rusichi. They lived in what is now the city of Great Novgorod, in Northern Russia.

Eventually, some Rusichi went South, mixed with Bulgars, as well as some Turks and Caucasians. These became Ukrainians.

Some went Westward, mixed with Lithuanians, Lyakhs (ancient Poles), and became Krivichi (Belarusians).

Others yet stayed in place. Eventually, a Viking tribe called Varyags came to ancient Novgorod. This was at a time when all the Vikings were settling down, tired of their sea travels, and endless battles and pillaging. The Varyags too wanted to start a new, peaceful existence. They made a deal with Rusich leaders: they will live together, Varyags will use their considerable martial prowess and skill to defend Novgorod against invaders, and in return, the Rusichi will teach them how to farm, hunt and fish, and make pottery and such things, all that they were very adept at.

So, the two people lived side by side, intermarried, mixed, learned each other's languages, to the point that they came up with a common tongue that is the Russian we know today (Ukrainians still joke that Russian is essentially old Ukrainian/Rusich with a Varyag accent). The new breed, called Ross, from which today's Rossya or Russia takes her name, were a strong people, fierce fighters and warriors, but also good farmers, skilled hunters and fishermen and talented craftsmen. A beautiful, proud new nation. So the legend goes. Which makes me think those ancestors of ours are spinning mad in their graves right now, seeing how much we've fucked up since then... Eventually, a Varyag man named Ryurik became the first Tsar of Novgorod, essentially the first leader of a unified Russian nation. And, of course, they drew from each other's mythologies and pantheons for children's fairly tales and things like that.

Hence, the similarities.
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Old Dec 9th 2010, 10:59 AM
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeMyselfAndI View Post
Well, Russians in particular we actually are partially Nordic/Scandinavian.

Here is a bit of history for you. There were a people once, very long ago, maybe before Christ, called Rusichi. They lived in what is now the city of Great Novgorod, in Northern Russia.

Eventually, some Rusichi went South, mixed with Bulgars, as well as some Turks and Caucasians. These became Ukrainians.

Some went Westward, mixed with Lithuanians, Lyakhs (ancient Poles), and became Krivichi (Belarusians).

Others yet stayed in place. Eventually, a Viking tribe called Varyags came to ancient Novgorod. This was at a time when all the Vikings were settling down, tired of their sea travels, and endless battles and pillaging. The Varyags too wanted to start a new, peaceful existence. They made a deal with Rusich leaders: they will live together, Varyags will use their considerable martial prowess and skill to defend Novgorod against invaders, and in return, the Rusichi will teach them how to farm, hunt and fish, and make pottery and such things, all that they were very adept at.

So, the two people lived side by side, intermarried, mixed, learned each other's languages, to the point that they came up with a common tongue that is the Russian we know today (Ukrainians still joke that Russian is essentially old Ukrainian/Rusich with a Varyag accent). The new breed, called Ross, from which today's Rossya or Russia takes her name, were a strong people, fierce fighters and warriors, but also good farmers, skilled hunters and fishermen and talented craftsmen. A beautiful, proud new nation. So the legend goes. Which makes me think those ancestors of ours are spinning mad in their graves right now, seeing how much we've fucked up since then... Eventually, a Varyag man named Ryurik became the first Tsar of Novgorod, essentially the first leader of a unified Russian nation. And, of course, they drew from each other's mythologies and pantheons for children's fairly tales and things like that.

Hence, the similarities.
Yes, I've previously asserted that Russia began as a colony of Swedes (Novgorod).

Indeed that follows, but the Swed-Rus thing isn't Slavic.

I suppose the Rus conquered the Slavs and imposed their religion upon them?
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Old Dec 9th 2010, 04:44 PM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

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Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Yes, I've previously asserted that Russia began as a colony of Swedes (Novgorod).

Indeed that follows, but the Swed-Rus thing isn't Slavic.

I suppose the Rus conquered the Slavs and imposed their religion upon them?
It's partially Slavic. And yes, there was a lot of conquest back then.
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Old Oct 13th 2013, 12:37 PM
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

Will this religion catch on?
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Last edited by NickKIELCEPoland; Oct 13th 2013 at 12:44 PM.
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Old Oct 13th 2013, 05:05 PM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

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Originally Posted by NickKIELCEPoland View Post
Will this religion catch on?
It is a big movement. There are as many as 3,000,000 pagans in Russia today: 2,000,000 rodnovery

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_neopaganism300,000 vedists

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_Vedism

And hundreds of thousands in other sects.

As the article notes, 20 years ago, only about 10,000 people countrywide would identify themselves as Rodnovers, and Vedism was simply unheard of in most places.
http://via-midgard.info/news/in_russ...rodnoverov.htm

So, they have grown fast. Rodnoverie could actually overtake Buddhism now, as Russia's third religion.

People are flocking back to the old folk religions

and some are taking on exotic new ones, such as Vedism or other types of Hinduism, especially Krishnaism


It seems to be worrying all the mainstream religious leaders. In March this year, Mitropolit Vladimir of Omsk

called together a Orthodox conference there, where they talked about how to fight the "beast worshipers".
http://www.svyatorus.com/new/3329-om...ychestvom.html

Meanwhile the Muslim All-Russia Muftiate said, in 2012, that it supports the government's decision to ban a number of Krishanite literature, and that this is not a Russian religion anyway, and should be itself banned from the country altogether.
http://static.newsland.com/news_imag...big_867080.jpg

If the holy ones are worried, that means there is, indeed, something to worry about

Last edited by MeMyselfAndI; Oct 13th 2013 at 05:10 PM.
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Old Oct 14th 2013, 02:47 AM
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NickKIELCEPoland NickKIELCEPoland is offline
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Default Re: Slavic Paganism

I bet old Kirill isn't happy about this development.
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