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  #31  
Old Dec 5th 2008, 03:23 PM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
No need for google:
OED : orig. referring to the club presentation of a new hat to a bowler taking three wickets successively.
I guess that refers to cricket.
That's essentially the same reference as for hockey. That is the commonly applied modern usage of the term.

The term's origin is older and more obscure than that. Indeed, what's the trick?

Edited to add: I suppose I should have googled this before I put it up. All google references just come to the cricket application. Fact is, the sport of cricket picked this expression up from somewhere else. I have the source in print, but I can't find anything on-line.

Fact is, some minor Lord during the reign of Elizabeth (the first) doffed his cap (as is customary) in front of the queen. Unfortunately, this Lord had a bad case of psorraisis on his bald head and Elizabeth almost tossed her cookies on the spot. The Queen immediately granted an exception to the rule about doffing one's cap to this particular Lord.

Fast-forward to the inauguration of Queen Victoria, when a descendant of that same Lord attended the presence of Queen Victoria - wearing a hat. This Lord walked directly in front of the Queen wearing his hat. Thinking the Queen didn't notice, he did it again, and even a third time. After that, the Queen stopped the fellow and berrated him (she was not amused!) for "this silly hat trick" and although she acknowledged the fellow's right to wear the hat (granted by her ancestors), the Queen insisted that it was still boorish and bad manners to do so. To which the Lord did doff his cap and scurried away.

The "gentleman's" sport of cricket was quick to pick-up the expression for calling something 'three times in a row' a hat-trick.

I'll look up the name of this Lord this weekend - I have this episode recorded in a history text on the social customs of England.
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  #32  
Old Dec 5th 2008, 03:48 PM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

So here's a new challenge... and one in keeping with the spirit of the season...

What is the origin of the (colorful) expression that it is "cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey"?

It certainly is cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey today!
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  #33  
Old Dec 5th 2008, 03:57 PM
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Dominick Dominick is offline
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
That's essentially the same reference as for hockey. That is the commonly applied modern usage of the term.

The term's origin is older and more obscure than that. Indeed, what's the trick?

Edited to add: I suppose I should have googled this before I put it up. All google references just come to the cricket application. Fact is, the sport of cricket picked this expression up from somewhere else. I have the source in print, but I can't find anything on-line.

Fact is, some minor Lord during the reign of Elizabeth (the first) doffed his cap (as is customary) in front of the queen. Unfortunately, this Lord had a bad case of psorraisis on his bald head and Elizabeth almost tossed her cookies on the spot. The Queen immediately granted an exception to the rule about doffing one's cap to this particular Lord.

Fast-forward to the inauguration of Queen Victoria, when a descendant of that same Lord attended the presence of Queen Victoria - wearing a hat. This Lord walked directly in front of the Queen wearing his hat. Thinking the Queen didn't notice, he did it again, and even a third time. After that, the Queen stopped the fellow and berrated him (she was not amused!) for "this silly hat trick" and although she acknowledged the fellow's right to wear the hat (granted by her ancestors), the Queen insisted that it was still boorish and bad manners to do so. To which the Lord did doff his cap and scurried away.

The "gentleman's" sport of cricket was quick to pick-up the expression for calling something 'three times in a row' a hat-trick.

I'll look up the name of this Lord this weekend - I have this episode recorded in a history text on the social customs of England.
Are you quote sure that's not some urban legend of elder days? It's just that this explanation doesn't even occur in my buddy and it would if it were considered genuine.
I'm not insisting on this to score a point in the game but to preserve the immaculacy of the Holy OED
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  #34  
Old Dec 5th 2008, 04:28 PM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
Are you quote sure that's not some urban legend of elder days? It's just that this explanation doesn't even occur in my buddy and it would if it were considered genuine.
I'm not insisting on this to score a point in the game but to preserve the immaculacy of the Holy OED
Not really. The OED has the same weakness as Wiki.

If it isn't quoted in newspapers (OED), or an online source (Wiki), then it doesn't exist.

And the OED only presumes expertise upon word usage and word origins. Colloquial expressions are outside the claimed expertise of the OED.
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  #35  
Old Dec 5th 2008, 06:40 PM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Not really. The OED has the same weakness as Wiki.

If it isn't quoted in newspapers (OED), or an online source (Wiki), then it doesn't exist.

And the OED only presumes expertise upon word usage and word origins. Colloquial expressions are outside the claimed expertise of the OED.
--> Follow up
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  #36  
Old Dec 9th 2008, 11:33 PM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
I'm following up - the info was in one of three books I have. I'm scanning all three books for the reference. Problem is, all three are interesting books... so I get hung up...

Anyway, the next challenge is posted above (freezing the balls off a brass monkey).
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  #37  
Old Jan 6th 2010, 03:17 AM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
I'm following up - the info was in one of three books I have. I'm scanning all three books for the reference. Problem is, all three are interesting books... so I get hung up...

Anyway, the next challenge is posted above (freezing the balls off a brass monkey).
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/c...%20monkey.html
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  #38  
Old Jan 6th 2010, 09:52 AM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
I'm following up - the info was in one of three books I have. I'm scanning all three books for the reference. Problem is, all three are interesting books... so I get hung up...
Hot damn! I just found another historical reference to the Victorian hat-trick - and had forgotten entirely about this!

Quote:
Originally Posted by justonemorevoice View Post
Excellent!

Feel free to set the next challenge!
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  #39  
Old Dec 15th 2012, 02:04 PM
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Default Re: Google Trivia Search

Which individual had the most negative impact on the environment in the entire history of mankind?
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  #40  
Old Dec 16th 2012, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
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Which individual had the most negative impact on the environment in the entire history of mankind?
Henry Ford?
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