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Old Jul 28th 2011, 09:39 PM
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Default Privacy

Considering past discussions regarding net privacy I thought this article might be of interest.

Is it a value added approach or is the general public too ignorant or caught up in itself to be concerned?
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  #2  
Old Jul 29th 2011, 12:07 PM
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Default Re: Privacy

I think it will catch on. As the novelty of social networking wears (has worn) off, people will probably settle into a more moderate approach with things. The arc of sites like friendster/myspace/facebook sort of demonstrate that - at first they were for the online/tech savvy younger generation, then they exploded in popularity and participation was relatively egalitarian, and now they're lapsing back into a format where they're dominated by narcissists and exhibitionists who want every aspect of their lives public.

The key thing to note here is the general response of the rest of the public. Slow withdrawal and ramped down participation. After the novelty of telling the world about the texture of our latest bowel movements wore off, we kind of settled back into a less hyperconnected existence, for the most part. For the non-exhibitionist types, social networking sites have become more of a way for people to keep in touch or to quietly indulge voyeurism, but this isn't substantially different than an address book and gossip at the local bar.

I personally think this is a great time for me to be ramping up my efforts on the home automation stuff. I think that over the next few years, "the cloud" will experience the same sort of cyclical tiredness, and people will be clamoring for a way to have their information accessible but managed, in terms of privacy. Do you really trust Google/Facebook/Microsoft to store all of your personal information on their servers in good faith...? No?

Well, how 'bout this? Screw "the cloud". I'll give you a server in you house that makes your data available to.... you, wherever you go. You can send it to "the cloud" if you want, but there's no reason that "the cloud" should have access to your financial bookkeeping, your list of possessions for insurance purposes, etc. If you find it convenient to share that with some website or some application somewhere, go nuts. But, that isn't the default. Your online privacy won't live and die by what some marketing VP somewhere decides to change the privacy settings to on your favorite website.

I see in the future a server or servers in every home, their management automated and simple enough for the average user to control.
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Old Jul 29th 2011, 08:56 PM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by drgoodtrips View Post
I think it will catch on. As the novelty of social networking wears (has worn) off, people will probably settle into a more moderate approach with things. The arc of sites like friendster/myspace/facebook sort of demonstrate that - at first they were for the online/tech savvy younger generation, then they exploded in popularity and participation was relatively egalitarian, and now they're lapsing back into a format where they're dominated by narcissists and exhibitionists who want every aspect of their lives public.

The key thing to note here is the general response of the rest of the public. Slow withdrawal and ramped down participation. After the novelty of telling the world about the texture of our latest bowel movements wore off, we kind of settled back into a less hyperconnected existence, for the most part. For the non-exhibitionist types, social networking sites have become more of a way for people to keep in touch or to quietly indulge voyeurism, but this isn't substantially different than an address book and gossip at the local bar.

I personally think this is a great time for me to be ramping up my efforts on the home automation stuff. I think that over the next few years, "the cloud" will experience the same sort of cyclical tiredness, and people will be clamoring for a way to have their information accessible but managed, in terms of privacy. Do you really trust Google/Facebook/Microsoft to store all of your personal information on their servers in good faith...? No?

Well, how 'bout this? Screw "the cloud". I'll give you a server in you house that makes your data available to.... you, wherever you go. You can send it to "the cloud" if you want, but there's no reason that "the cloud" should have access to your financial bookkeeping, your list of possessions for insurance purposes, etc. If you find it convenient to share that with some website or some application somewhere, go nuts. But, that isn't the default. Your online privacy won't live and die by what some marketing VP somewhere decides to change the privacy settings to on your favorite website.
I've long used second HDs for immediate backups (was at one time tempted by server software to mirror the primary) and personal, secured websites for offsite storage of the data you mention.

Quote:
I see in the future a server or servers in every home, their management automated and simple enough for the average user to control.
Your plan is to automate what I do manually with a user friendly interface similar to setting a home alarm system? Onsite and offsite backup storage? If so all the pieces are there, making it sound very feasible for average users with stationary and mobile applications(ignoring the effort required to develop such a system suitable for average users). The marketing/pricing would be very interesting. Option for new PCs and after-market to capture existing systems or?

From my viewpoint, once you get your plan formalized to a point of producing a dog & pony show with some initial copyrights to seek venture capital it sounds like you could well have a winner. In this day and age the best advice I can offer is time waits for no man in getting it together.
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Old Jul 29th 2011, 11:14 PM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by drgoodtrips View Post
I think it will catch on. As the novelty of social networking wears (has worn) off, people will probably settle into a more moderate approach with things. The arc of sites like friendster/myspace/facebook sort of demonstrate that - at first they were for the online/tech savvy younger generation, then they exploded in popularity and participation was relatively egalitarian, and now they're lapsing back into a format where they're dominated by narcissists and exhibitionists who want every aspect of their lives public.

The key thing to note here is the general response of the rest of the public. Slow withdrawal and ramped down participation. After the novelty of telling the world about the texture of our latest bowel movements wore off, we kind of settled back into a less hyperconnected existence, for the most part. For the non-exhibitionist types, social networking sites have become more of a way for people to keep in touch or to quietly indulge voyeurism, but this isn't substantially different than an address book and gossip at the local bar.

I personally think this is a great time for me to be ramping up my efforts on the home automation stuff. I think that over the next few years, "the cloud" will experience the same sort of cyclical tiredness, and people will be clamoring for a way to have their information accessible but managed, in terms of privacy. Do you really trust Google/Facebook/Microsoft to store all of your personal information on their servers in good faith...? No?

Well, how 'bout this? Screw "the cloud". I'll give you a server in you house that makes your data available to.... you, wherever you go. You can send it to "the cloud" if you want, but there's no reason that "the cloud" should have access to your financial bookkeeping, your list of possessions for insurance purposes, etc. If you find it convenient to share that with some website or some application somewhere, go nuts. But, that isn't the default. Your online privacy won't live and die by what some marketing VP somewhere decides to change the privacy settings to on your favorite website.

I see in the future a server or servers in every home, their management automated and simple enough for the average user to control.
Regarding home automation, have you checked this out?
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Old Jul 31st 2011, 09:17 AM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americano View Post
Considering past discussions regarding net privacy I thought this article might be of interest.

Is it a value added approach or is the general public too ignorant or caught up in itself to be concerned?
I think the marketplace moves with changing fashions and tastes. The privacy thing has turned out to piss a lot of people off. Dozens of major corporations have failed to secure privacy for their customers - which leads to identity theft and credit problems for their customers. No surprise that a backlash is building.

As far as I'm concerned, Facebook is just as much a fad as was AOL, IM and MySpace. These things come and go over relatively short periods of time. Facebook's present growth has been coming only from corporations using it for marketing or underage kids flooding the place with endless and inane drivel. That's not a viable business model.
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Old Jul 31st 2011, 09:38 AM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by drgoodtrips View Post
I see in the future a server or servers in every home, their management automated and simple enough for the average user to control.
Agreed. The market has been pushing 'cloud' computing for a couple decades now and it just isn't popular because no one trusts companies like Microsoft, Google, IBM, Apple or Sun Microsystems to serve their best interests of privacy, security and utility.

Privacy, security and utility are best served with your own server and thus, this is most likely to be the end result.
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Old Jul 31st 2011, 10:00 AM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
I think the marketplace moves with changing fashions and tastes. The privacy thing has turned out to piss a lot of people off. Dozens of major corporations have failed to secure privacy for their customers - which leads to identity theft and credit problems for their customers. No surprise that a backlash is building.

As far as I'm concerned, Facebook is just as much a fad as was AOL, IM and MySpace. These things come and go over relatively short periods of time. Facebook's present growth has been coming only from corporations using it for marketing or underage kids flooding the place with endless and inane drivel. That's not a viable business model.
I think drgoodtrips nailed Facebook with it originally offering a new, faddish method of communication. After the dust settled and revenue streams were disclosed, many users realized they were the unwitting sole product. There was suddenly a flood saying no, I don't want my selection of disposable consumer products solely defined by a crowd of narcissistic teens and young adults nor my private information available for purposes that could cause me harm. That redefined the social communications market.
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Old Aug 1st 2011, 02:56 PM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarquon View Post
Regarding home automation, have you checked this out?
I hadn't seen that before, but it looks like others that I've seen. There's a decent amount of overlap with my vision, but it falls into (in my opinion) the same trap of shortsightedness that the rest I've seen so far do. Specifically, the system appears mainly to be the interaction of a set of "smart", distributed devices. If they interact with any central intelligence, I'm betting that it's the company's remote servers (hence the monthly fees, and with the probable customer objection of trusting control of their lights and appliances to some server in Utah).

I picture a system where a server in the home itself has all of the intelligence governing the system, and the server is capable of accepting plugins (or, I suppose I should call them "apps" since that's the trendy word for software).

Still, that one seems to offer a marginally better price point than others that I've seen. However, I'm envisioning something lower, and no monthly fee. Once I'd show up at your house and setup the equipment, you're free to use/modify as-is. Monthly fees would be opt in service or plus agreements.
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Old Aug 1st 2011, 03:07 PM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americano View Post
I've long used second HDs for immediate backups (was at one time tempted by server software to mirror the primary) and personal, secured websites for offsite storage of the data you mention.



Your plan is to automate what I do manually with a user friendly interface similar to setting a home alarm system? Onsite and offsite backup storage? If so all the pieces are there, making it sound very feasible for average users with stationary and mobile applications(ignoring the effort required to develop such a system suitable for average users). The marketing/pricing would be very interesting. Option for new PCs and after-market to capture existing systems or?

From my viewpoint, once you get your plan formalized to a point of producing a dog & pony show with some initial copyrights to seek venture capital it sounds like you could well have a winner. In this day and age the best advice I can offer is time waits for no man in getting it together.
Yeah, the time thing is big. I've had this in my head for 3 years, and I'm losing ground to would-be competitors. I've sort of lucked out in that Apple, with its cachet and recent trendiness managed to reset the clock to 1994 as far as mobile devices are concerned, but sooner or later the tech world is going to collectively figure out how stupid the "app" is. (Hey, look, I just downloaded a program that lets me go on ebay! It's like accessing it through my web browser on my computer, but on my phone, it takes up disk space, needs constant updating, and sometimes crashes! If only my phone had a 3.5 inch floppy drive so I could load apps when I'm in my basement and not getting a signal!)

But, I digress. I have a business plan in place, and now that I've set up my professional website, I'm getting back to developing in earnest. And yes, I'm going to automate a lot of things that are generally done manually - backup of sensitive information, storage of financial/house/insurance info, things of that nature. That's in addition to the actual mechanical/electrical automation tasks. Even rigging up a simple home alarm system is pretty straightforward and inexpensive.
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Old Aug 1st 2011, 03:10 PM
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Default Re: Privacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Agreed. The market has been pushing 'cloud' computing for a couple decades now and it just isn't popular because no one trusts companies like Microsoft, Google, IBM, Apple or Sun Microsystems to serve their best interests of privacy, security and utility.

Privacy, security and utility are best served with your own server and thus, this is most likely to be the end result.
What I like about the idea of "the cloud" is that software services can be performed elsewhere, in places that can afford the cycles that we burn through. I'd prefer a setup where your data was local and your own, and the actual software services were what made up the cloud. I think it's cool that I can use google's document editor through my browser - not so much that all of my documents reside on google servers.

To me, it seems as if everything is temporarily bass-ackwards, especially with mobile devices. We load our phones up with crap that shouldn't need to run on them and then ship our private data to people that shouldn't have it.
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